First Nation considers farming deal with feds

295

Members of K’atlodeeche First Nation will be voting later this month on whether to ratify an agreement with the federal government over agricultural benefits in Treaty 8.

The Crown’s agricultural commitments in Treaty 8 are often referred to as the “cows and plows” promise.

As agreed in 1900, the treaty obliges the federal government to provide farming equipment including “two hoes, one spade, one scythe and two hay forks for every family so settled, and for every three families one plough and one harrow, and to the Chief, for the use of his Band, two horses or a yoke of oxen, and for each Band potatoes, barley, oats and wheat (if such seed be suited to the locality of the reserve),” among other things.

A vote, planned for Nov. 28, is in the works to change that.

The CEO of the First Nation has declined to say how much money was in the proposed agreement, explaining it is a confidential offer.

“The members have been provided a full package of what’s being offered and they’re being asked to vote on that,” said Peter Groenen, chief executive officer with KFN.

If the agreement is approved by the membership at the ratification vote later this month, Groenen said there will be another set of discussions with the community about how the money will be managed and used.

“That vote is strictly to accept the offer. Yes or no to accept the offer,” he said. “There’s nothing in this vote about the distribution of the money or anything. It’s about accepting the offer from Canada.”

Groenen did say it’s a financial compensation in lieu of the promises for agricultural equipment and support in Treaty 8.

“This is one of the promises made in Treaty 8 in 1900 that was never fulfilled,” he said. “So this is just the one promise in the treaty that is being ratified. For the rest of the treaty, there are ongoing discussions in other areas.”

Groenen noted the band council is recommending acceptance of the offer.

The CEO pointed out about 20 other First Nations under Treaty 8 have also received offers and are in the ratification process.

“Each group had their own negotiating team,” he said.

“I think the offers might be similar, but we don’t know because all the offers are confidential.”

The so-called ‘cows and plows’ promise, as outlined in Treaty 8

“Further, Her Majesty agrees that each Band that elects to take a reserve and cultivate the soil, shall, as soon as convenient after such reserve is set aside and settled upon, and the Band has signified its choice and is prepared to break up the soil, receive two hoes, one spade, one scythe and two hay forks for every family so settled, and for every three families one plough and one harrow, and to the Chief, for the use of his Band, two horses or a yoke of oxen, and for each Band potatoes, barley, oats and wheat (if such seed be suited to the locality of the reserve), to plant the land actually broken up, and provisions for one month in the spring for several years while planting such seeds; and to every family one cow, and every Chief one bull, and one mowing-machine and one reaper for the use of his Band when it is ready for them; for such families as prefer to raise stock instead of cultivating the soil, every family of five persons, two cows, and every Chief two bulls and two mowing-machines when ready for their use, and a like proportion for smaller or larger families. The aforesaid articles, machines and cattle to be given once for all for the encouragement of agriculture and stock raising; and for such Bands as prefer to continue hunting and fishing, as much ammunition and twine for making nets annually as will amount in value to one dollar per head of the families so engaged in hunting and fishing.”

source: Treaty 8
Previous articleCommunications plan for town and authority
Next articleGoogle takes viewers to the top of the world
As the Yellowknifer’s crime reporter, it’s my job to keep readers up to speed on all-things “cops and courts” related. From house fires and homicides to courtroom clashes, it’s my responsibility to be there - day or night, rain or shine. When I’m not at court gathering stories, I’m in the office, making calls to lawyers, emailing RCMP and tracking down sources. After hours, I rely on the public to let me know what’s happening and where. Entering my second winter in Yellowknife since leaving my hometown of Peterborough, Ont., in October 2017, everyday on this beat continues to be challenging, rewarding and fulfilling. Got a story? Call me at (867) 766-8288 or shoot me an email at editorial@nnsl.com.