Seeking justice for experimental Eskimos

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There was a time when Jeanne Mike faced a lifetime sentence of loss and longing, a sentence that began when she was removed from her family home in Pangnirtung at age seven. Mike’s braids were shorn and she became one of seven known Inuit children who were collected into a federal government program called The...
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Michele LeTourneau first arrived at NNSL's headquarters in Yellowknife in1998, with a BA honours in Theatre. For four years she documented the arts across the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Following a very short stint as a communications officer with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Michele spent a decade at a community-based environmental monitoring board in the mining industry, where she worked with Inuit, Chipewyan, Tlicho, Yellowknives Dene and Metis elders to help develop traditional knowledge and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit contributions for monitoring and management plans. She rejoined NNSL and moved to Iqaluit in May 2014 to write for Nunavut News. Michele has received a dozen awards for her work with NNSL.