Family dance keeps residents moving

This was the first time that Inuvik’s Children First Society has hosted a Family Dance in over two years

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After popular demand from youth and parents alike, Inuvik’s Children First Society hosted its first Family Dance in more than two years at the community hall in the Midnight Sun Complex on March 1.

“It was so popular. Everybody was asking when we would do it again. We tried to get a date last year but it was so busy,” said Angela Storr, the organization’s program outreach coordinator.

The dance came equipped with a disco ball, a fog machine and strobe lights. Songs from Disney films or music from artists such as Crazy Frog and ABBA were just some of the tunes that kept the kids moving. Some of the youth, specifically the younger girls, came dressed for the occasion, where they wore princess costumes.

“(Families) were really excited, because there’s not a lot of events, especially for the little kids,” Storr said. “There’s old-time dances, but they’re not really aimed for children.”

Four-year-old Matthew Owen “flossed” his way to the centre of the dance floor during a Family Dance event hosted by Inuvik’s Children First Society at the Midnight Sun Complex on March 1. Aaron Hemens/NNSL Photo
Four-year-old Matthew Owen “flossed” his way to the centre of the dance floor during a Family Dance event hosted by Inuvik’s Children First Society at the Midnight Sun Complex on March 1. Aaron Hemens/NNSL Photo

In the middle of the packed community hall was the dance floor, which was surrounded by tables layered with brown paper, where children could colour or doodle with the crayons scattered throughout the room.

There were also bubbles, washable tattoos and glow sticks ready for the kids to play with. Apart from dancing, the youth also engaged in a dizzy stick and played a shoe mix-up game, “just to get them running,” Storr said.

“It’s all directed at the kids. It’s all for the kids,” she added.

Storr said the goal of the event was to promote healthy families, and she was happy to see families get out of their homes and move their feet.

“It makes me feel really good because being inside – even for me – is a little crazy, especially for the really active children. We have the gym open Wednesday mornings and they come and burn off their energy,” she said. “It’s fun to see, especially in the winter time because they can’t really outside, being all dressed up.”

A concession stand was also set up, where donuts, cinnamon rolls, candies and pop were sold to keep the youth energized. There was also salad and chili sold, which was popular among the adults.

Raffle tickets were also distributed, where prizes such as fruits and vegetables, sewing kits, slime kits, planter starter kits and books were handed out.

While the family dance only happens once a year, Storr said she hopes to coordinate similar dancing activities at the Society’s gym. Last month, the Society hosted a DANCEPL3Y fitness and dance class for parents and their kids, where participants engaged in various dance moves as a means of exercising their fundamental movement skills.

“We’re hoping to open up their eyes to our activities that we’re trying to promote. It’s been a little bit quiet,” she said. “It might be the weather but I’m not sure. But yeah, just open their eyes to the facilities that we have and the programs that I do.”

Planning and organizing for the dance began a month ago, according to Storr. With the dance’s popularity, she said the Society hopes to continue to make it an annual event in the future.

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