The bear, the image, and climate change

419
His images of a dying polar bear – seen by millions around the world – became the emblem of the dire consequences of climate warming, and though that wasn’t his intent, Paul Nicklen is happy his work is causing a stir. Nicklen is part of a group called Sea Legacy, and its mission is to “create...
Previous articleFirst batch of NWT Arctic Winter Games trials wrap up
Next articleKevin Koe headed to 2018 Winter Olympics
Michele LeTourneau
Michele LeTourneau first arrived at NNSL's headquarters in Yellowknife in1998, with a BA honours in Theatre. For four years she documented the arts across the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Following a very short stint as a communications officer with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Michele spent a decade at a community-based environmental monitoring board in the mining industry, where she worked with Inuit, Chipewyan, Tlicho, Yellowknives Dene and Metis elders to help develop traditional knowledge and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit contributions for monitoring and management plans. She rejoined NNSL and moved to Iqaluit in May 2014 to write for Nunavut News. Michele has received a dozen awards for her work with NNSL.